Today’s Headlines

  • Brookings Releases Solid Set of Infrastructure Policy Recommendations
  • Smart Growth America Outlines Policy Priorities for the Next Administration
  • Strong Towns Has Been Discussing What Federal Infrastructure Strategy Should Look Like
  • Rails-to-Trails Releases Active Transportation Recommendations for the Next President
  • It’s Time to Think About Retrofitting Parking Garages for Housing (Wired)
  • Canada Launching Its Own Infrastructure Stimulus (Reuters)
  • Newsy: Self-Driving Cars Might Make Pedestrians Uppity
  • Should the Feds Take Over D.C. Metro? Greater Greater Washington Considers

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Why Reformers Should Care How We Pay for Transportation

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TIFIAs and TIGERs and NIBs — oh my! The alphabet soup of infrastructure funding mechanisms can be alienating even to committed transportation advocates. But with the power of the gas tax diminishing and elected officials refusing to raise it, other financing options are taking on increasing importance. If you’re interested in reforming our transportation system […]

How the Accommodations We Make for Cars Impose Huge Costs on Cities

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Wide highways, big parking lots, dangerous intersections designed for speed — there are a lot of downsides to all this car-centric infrastructure, including the way it saps the fiscal health of cities. Bill Lindeke at Network blog Streets.mn lists seven, from the erosion of the local tax base due to land consumed for highways to public health costs in the form of […]

Would an Infrastructure Bank Have the Power to Reform Transportation?

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Our report yesterday on transportation financing may have left you with a few more questions. We started with a look at TIFIA, which provides credit assistance for infrastructure projects. Many observers see the program as limited by its position inside the DOT and its opaque decision-making process. But what about a National Infrastructure Bank, you ask? Transportation […]

The Highs and Lows of Hillary’s Bland Infrastructure Plan

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We’re getting some insight into what White House transportation policy would look like in a Hillary Clinton administration, following the Democratic frontrunner’s release of a 5-year, $275 billion infrastructure plan yesterday. It’s not exactly a visionary plan, but despite its blandness it’s still likely to be DOA if Republicans retain control of Congress as expected. Clinton’s “briefing” calls for $275 […]