Talking Headways: Food Culture, Regional Urban Form, and Mall Memories

This week we’re joined by Kristen Jeffers, communications and membership manager for Bike Walk KC and author of The Black Urbanist blog. Kristen tells me how she got started blogging, what got her interested in urbanism, and how she hopes to inspire others.

We get into a discussion about the meaning of equity, and what it means to be a “national” or “global” urbanist. From there we delve into the differences between regions (including food culture), the retail and service needs of people in downtowns and urban places, and how people’s sentimental memories from the places they shop and visit stay with them and shape their connection to place.

Join us for a fun conversation about regional department stores, hair salons, and more!

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