Talking Headways Podcast: Uber and the Case of the Hidden Gas Tax

podcast icon logoUber is celebrating. DC passed an Uber-legalization law that Uber thinks cities the world over should follow. The problem is, most cities have much more tightly regulated taxi industries than DC, with a far higher cost of entry. In those cases, letting Uber get away with providing taxi services while complying with none of the rules is unfair. The taxi companies have been screaming about this for a while now. Uber’s response is something like, “Catch me if you can, old geezer.” DC’s contribution to that conversation strengthens Uber’s position.

In other news, a front group for the oil industry is trying to cause panic among California drivers about a “hidden gas tax” that’s going to hit come January. What they’re really talking about is California’s landmark cap-and-trade law to limit greenhouse gas emissions, which will start including transportation fuels at the beginning of the year. Jeff and I called up Melanie Curry of Streetsblog LA to explain to us a campaign that didn’t seem to really make any sense and she assured us that we’re not crazy; it really doesn’t make any sense.

Stay tuned; our election recap edition will be coming out shortly.

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Uber CEO Travis Kalanick's recent meltdown hints at problems with the company's business model. Photo:  Heisenberg Media via Creative Commons

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Today’s Headlines

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Top Senators Still Sound Confident About a Long-Term Transpo Bill (The Hill) Uber Faces $7M Fine, Suspension in California (CNN Money) Cleveland and Other Midwest Cities See Downtown Surge (Crain’s) A New Generation of Conservative Pundits Are Embracing Smart Urban Planning (Pacific Standard) GBTA Report Looks at Business Traveler Trends, With Uber Overtaking Taxis (USA Today) Across the […]