You Can Now Bring Street Transformations to Life With Google Street View

indy

If you ever want to show someone that it’s possible to change streets and cities for the better, Google Street View can now help you do it.

Google recently made it possible to view archived Street View images. This means it’s easier than ever to show what streets looked like before and after a redesign. (Thanks to the Institute for Quality Communities at the University of Oklahoma for bringing our attention to this new feature.)

We were able to animate a few street transformations from around the country with the new Street View feature. Above you can see the arrival of the Indianapolis Cultural Trail on North Street. People for Bikes called the project the second-best protected bike lane in the United States.

Allen Street on New York’s Lower East Side features one of the city’s most unique bikeways, which runs in the center of the street and is part of a boulevard-style median, complete with small plazas like this one in what used to be the middle of intersections:

Here’s I-40 in Oklahoma City before and after it was torn down. The city is planning to redevelop the area with a walkable, at-grade boulevard:

I40real-2

This is the 5.2-acre Klyde Warren Park in Dallas, which opened in 2012 after the Woodall Rodgers Freeway was capped:

dallas

Here’s Cleveland’s Euclid Corridor, during and after the installation of its Healthline bus rapid transit (the Street View shots come from somewhat different angles). The Healthline has been called the best example of bus rapid transit in the country, and locals credit it with helping spur billions of dollars in nearby development.

euclid

So that’s a taste of how you can now use Street View to show how American cities are making streets better for people — not just cars. If you’ve got other street transformations you’d like to share, tell us about them in the comments.

  • J

    This is amazing and a good advocacy tool to show how things can change. it makes change a bit less scary.

  • Diagonalec

    1. This stuff has to be published on Huffington, Fox, Msnbc etc.
    2. Include the numbers on raised real estate values and increased retail sales
    3. For future NIMBYs it can not get more straight-in-your-face than this 🙂

  • I just read the alternate universe NIMBY Streetsblog where this post is headlined “You Can Now See How Much Parking We’ve Lost with Google Street View.”

  • Kevin Love

    That’s the best example of BRT in the USA? No barriers to keep cars out. Zero bike parking at the station – with the space going to planters instead.

    If that’s “the best” then we’ve really got a long way to go.

  • Gezellig

    Yeah for example the Orange Line in LA is totally separated from car traffic–I used to live a few blocks from an Orange Line stop and it was great.

    Btw, a Streetview Before/After with the Orange Line:

    https://www.google.com/maps/@34.201026,-118.597141,3a,75y,167.39h,84.47t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sRfk84eEpF4-xRZlYEgZYzg!2e0

  • StreetView.IO

    Google Street View services is going far nowadays. Pacman covering areas under Oceans, Mountain peaks, Exotic beaches, Antartica regions, etc.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Vote for the Best Urban Street Transformation of 2015

|
It’s almost time to say goodbye to 2015, which means we’re about to hand out Streetsies to recognize achievements for walking, biking, and transit in American cities this year. Earlier this month we asked readers for nominations for the Best Urban Street Transformation of the year, and here are the standouts from your submissions. It’s a great batch and […]

Streets Have Changed Before, and They Can Change Again

|
Some of the fiercest battles over streets come down to resistance to change — fears that claiming a lane of traffic for transit will cause carmageddon, or that converting parking spaces to bike lanes will starve local businesses of customers. Darin Givens at ATL Urbanist says some of that resistance stems from a failure of imagination. By looking at how […]