Portland’s Tilikum Crossing, a Bridge for the 21st Century

Photo: Portland's Tilikum Bridge will serve only sustainable transportation, in contrast to the Columbia River Crossing. Photo: Project website
Portland’s Tilikum Crossing will serve only spatially efficient modes, in contrast to the car-centric Columbia River Crossing. Image: Trimet

Tilikum Crossing, a new bridge across the Willamette River in Portland, is everything the hated Columbia River Crossing was not. While the CRC would have devoted billions to expanding car lanes and new highway interchanges, the Tilikum will serve only transit, biking, and walking.

Matthew Nelson at Electric Urbanism says the fact that one bridge — the CRC — was rejected and this other bridge is moving forward says a lot about evolving ideas about transportation in the United States, and how Portland has positioned itself as a leader: 

One one hand, the CRC is representative of business as usual in the United States — cars and trucks are the only modes that count, and their movement must be optimized at the expense of every other form of mobility. On the other hand, the Tilikum is representative of Oregon’s commitment to sustainable transportation policy by putting transit riders first (this priority led a local conservative radio host to label the bridge “the Auto-ban”). While it is being constructed to carry trains to Milwaukie on TriMet’s newest MAX light rail line, it will also likely someday serve a future high capacity transit line down the Powell-Division Corridor as well as buses that currently crawl across nearby auto-clogged bridges and the Streetcar’s new Central Loop.

In this “tale of two crossings,” the rejection of the CRC shows that there is little appetite in the Metro region for the car-centric mega-projects reminiscent of the 20th Century, while the Tilikum will stand as a bold, iconic testament to Portland’s values and to the city’s legacy of transportation innovation.

Elsewhere on the Network today: Stop and Move has a reminder that the Nashville Amp isn’t the only BRT project under threat right now — Tea Party forces in Fresno have basically strangled the city’s proposed BRT routes. Better Institutions argues that limiting density constrains people’s choices about where to live. And Better Cities & Towns! offers 10 compelling reasons why the “American dream” is in need of revision.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Touring Portland’s Brand New Car-Free Bridge

|
Okay, it seems like now Portland is just showing off. The city is putting the finishing touches on the Tilikum Bridge, a multi-modal span that will serve buses, cyclists, pedestrians and trains — but no cars. This bridge has it all: a safe walking and biking path, transitways free of traffic congestion, sleek design, bike counters, a […]

Ding Dong, Portland’s CRC Mega-Highway Is Dead!

|
It’s a good day for advocates of a more human-scaled transportation system. The Portland region’s $3.2 billion, bi-state mega-highway project, the unassumingly-named Columbia River Crossing, won’t be built. The Washington state legislature adjourned yesterday without voting on a transportation package that would have provided funding for the project, which led the Columbian to say, stick […]

Portland’s CRC Highway Project Is Dead — And Buried

|
We’ve said it before, and it gives us great pleasure to say it again: Portland’s Columbia River Crossing highway megaproject is dead. And this time it appears the project is finally, definitely deceased. Oregon lawmakers adjourned this week without authorizing funding for the $3 billion-plus bridge and highway widening project. Last year, it looked like […]

The Columbia River Crossing: A Highway Boondoggle in Disguise

|
The Columbia River Crossing is a mega-project by any standard. A bridge replacement, a highway widening, and light rail project wrapped into one, the CRC is a proposal to span the distance between Portland, Oregon and Vancouver, Washington. With a $3.2 billion price tag — by conservative estimates — it would be the largest public […]

The Opportunity Costs of Highway Expansion

|
In case you haven’t heard, gas tax revenues aren’t what they used to be. In this kind of fiscally-constrained environment, every dollar spent on big, expensive transportation projects is a dollar that won’t be spent on smaller but smarter local transportation needs. Yet around the country, mega-highway plans conceived in a different era continue to march […]