Streetsblog Capitol Hill Q&A With Leon Krier

Architect Leon Krier has been dubbed the godfather of new urbanism. His work on the U.K.’s Poundbury development project, spearheaded by Prince Charles, has made the Luxembourg-born Krier one of the world’s most talked-about urban planners.

Krier_Cartoon1_thumb.jpgA drawing by Leon Krier — click here to see full-size version (Image: 2Blowhards)

When Krier won the University of Notre Dame’s inaugural Driehaus Prize for classical architecture, Congress for the New Urbanism co-founder Andres Duany’s was quoted describing a Krier lecture that changed the course of his career.

"I realized I couldn’t go on designing these fashionable tall buildings,
which were fascinating visually, but didn’t produce any healthy urban
effect. They wouldn’t affect society in a positive way," Duany said.

“The prospect of instead creating traditional communities where our
plans could actually make someone’s daily life better really excited
me."

Krier will be delivering a lecture at Washington D.C.’s Corcoran Gallery of Art tonight on the themes of his work and his latest book, The Architecture of Community. He sat down to speak with Streetsblog Capitol Hill about America, its transportation infrastructure, and his call for cities to consider the "human scale" as they develop.

Q. What do you think of congestion pricing?

A. Like most experiments with urban space, it was taken without an examination of the consequences. Congestion pricing … tries to make people feel guilty about what they’re doing. [Transportation decisions] are not a matter of our personal responsibility, they are a matter of our collective responsibility. You can’t ask people to change their lives overnight. It’s not possible, and I don’t think it’s even desirable.

We are part of a global empire that relies on fossil fuel. How can we design our cities to modify our behaviors in the long term so people do not feel guilty? [The cities of the future] should be structured in a way that they can survive the depletion of fossil fuels. That’s where there is no discussion and needs to be a discussion.

Q. Do you see tension developing in the U.S., particularly its political sphere, between urbanites and those who live outside cities?

A. I thought there would be pressing demand at the [Obama] White House for environmental thinkers like Andres Duany, because there are very few people who have thought about what to do about how our cities are arranged. There is very little statistical, factual knowledge that can be used to convince people that an alternative is ready — and it’s ready. The only public figure I know [with such knowledge] is Prince Charles, who has been thinking and publishing on these issues for decades. They think he’s a nutcase … because he thought that by mentioning these subjects, [urbanism] would be picked up on and developed.

Q. What would your message be to Americans who are working to make their cities more livable and sustainable?

A. The yardstick [for urban planning] is the human body — the size of your legs, how far can you walk? In the future, cities should be designed so most activities can be reached by foot. It’s scale not only in the horizontal dimension, but in the vertical dimension. What I’m saying is, I don’t want these conditions to be imposed, but to be designed.

How do you re-establish the human scale? I mean in an anthropological sense, a methodological sense, not an emotional one. The suburb and the skyscraper are two culprits that should be gotten rid of.

(ed. note: Krier’s remarks have been edited for space and continuity.)

  • Kenney

    Elana, thanks for this! Never heard of the guy before, but this teaser interview above was enough to make me plan to go to the Corcoran tonight. Well, it looks like the House is voting on an extension. 11 mins 9 secs left…

  • Congestion pricing isn’t about making people feel guilty, it’s about putting a price on a limited good in the market (road space) in order to manage it more effectively. This is one way we can structure cities to survive the depletion of fossil fuels, as he puts it. Congestion pricing has the added benefit of generating revenue, which can be used to enhance the transit network, thus providing more options for getting around and contributing to the efficiency of the entire regional transportation network.

    But I agree with the rest of what he has to say, particularly about building cities for the human scale.

  • Steve Davis

    Good clarification, Petra. I generally liked all of his other comments, but I thought that one was also a little off-base.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Rail~volution: Will New Americans Fuel Smart Growth or Suburbanism?

|
This year’s Rail~volution conference — the annual gathering of livability advocates, urban sustainability coordinators, and transit agency officials – kicked off today with remarks by Chris Leinberger of the Brookings Institution and Manuel Pastor, who teaches demographics and ethnicity at the University of Southern California. Leinberger noted that Hollywood does more consumer research than anyone […]

New Urbanist Silverback Andres Duany and the Young Locusts

|
Iz in ur city uzing ur urbanizm. (Photo: St0rmz via Flickr) If you’ve been roaming the urbanist blogosphere this week, you may have happened upon the comments made by one of the progenitors of New Urbanism, Andres Duany, in an interview with the Atlantic. Duany, apparently, has a problem with young people coming into a […]

Urbanism in the Age of Climate Change

|
Image © Peter Calthorpe & Marianna Leuschel Editor’s note: Today we are very pleased to begin a five-part series of excerpts from Peter Calthorpe’s book, “Urbanism in the Age of Climate Change.” Keep reading this week and next to learn how you can win a copy of the book from Island Press. I take as […]

“Urbanism Should Be Second Nature”

|
What type of place is your city? Can you step out of your home day or night and catch a bus without too much hassle? Can you pick up your favorite sweet treat or a much-needed toilet paper refill with just a short stroll? Perhaps most importantly, can you find a place to live you […]

Leinberger: Walkable Urbanism Is the Future, and DC Is the Model

|
Chris Leinberger wears too many hats to count – real estate developer, George Washington University professor, Brookings fellow – but he has one message: “Walkable urbanism is the future.” For years now, Leinberger has been preaching the gospel that the postwar era of automobile-oriented “drivable suburbanism” is over – and urbanism is the new wave. […]

Transit Speed and Urbanism: It’s Complicated

|
There’s been a rollicking online debate the past week on the subject of “slow transit.” Matt Yglesias at Vox and Yonah Freemark at Transport Politic noted the downsides of two transit projects — the DC streetcar and the Twin Cities’ Green Line, respectively — arguing that they run too slowly to deserve transit advocates’ unqualified […]