Livable Streets Projects Getting Hung Up in Budget Bureaucracy?

From today’s Crain’s Insider:

The city is weighing a new set of street design guidelines that would make installation of pedestrian-friendly elements, like curb extensions, easier. The Department of Transportation has developed a number of new street and traffic plans in Madison Square Park and other places around the city. But each one requires special budgetary approval, and the city wants to streamline the process. By adopting a series of pre-approved templates, the city could implement the designs without getting capital approval.

  • JK

    Your headline is negative, but this is a big positive. The article says DOT is working to streamline the budget process. This is great news. This will cut years and months off of projects, and allow smart people in the agency to spend time changing the streets instead of filling out paperwork.

  • Hopefully this will make it easier to continue livable streets progress in the next mayoral administration.

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