Bloomberg Declares Support for a National Carbon Tax

New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg will
declare his support today for a national carbon tax, according to a
report posted this morning on the New York Times City Room blog by
metro reporter Sewell Chan:

Mayor Bloomberg plans
to announce today his support for a national carbon tax. In what his
aides are calling one of the most significant policy addresses of his
second and final term, the mayor will argue that directly taxing
emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases that contribute
to climate change will slow global
warming, promote economic growth and stimulate technological innovation
— even if it results in higher gasoline prices in the short term.

Mr.
Bloomberg is scheduled to present his carbon tax proposal in a speech
this afternoon at a two-day climate protection summit in Seattle
organized by the United States Conference of Mayors. (A copy of the speech was provided to The New York Times by aides to the mayor; the full text is available here, along with the complete Times story.)

Needless to say, Charles Komanoff at the recently spiffed-up Carbon Tax Center, thinks this is a big deal (worthy of an Oscar or a Nobel Peace Prize, perhaps?):

With his speech today, Mayor Bloomberg joins former Vice-President Al
Gore as the nation’s leading advocates of a carbon tax to cap and
reduce carbon emissions from fossil fuels.

And consistent with the Mayor’s local transportation policy push:

Bloomberg’s support of a U.S. carbon tax is philosophically consistent
with his big current local initiative, a congestion pricing plan to
improve mobility, economic activity and the quality of life in the
Manhattan Central Business District by charging an entry fee for motor
vehicles. A carbon tax and congestion pricing both embody the principle
that safeguarding “the commons” — our air, water and public space –
requires that we exact from ourselves a commensurate price for uses
that damage or deplete it.